Myfanwy Thomas, written by Daniel O’Malley

The Rook

I initially encountered The Rook on Kim‘s Instagram feed over the summer, and she blogged more about it here. With a description like “Ghostbusters meets James Bond meets Memento, if James Bond were a lady spy who is also a kickass administrative genius,” I kind of had to read it. And broke my only reading challenge for the year, but whatever, it was so worth it. I like weird fiction and fascinating female characters, and this book definitely hit the spot.

The book centers around Myfanwy (rhymes with Tiffany) Thomas, who has to be one of the most unusual characters I’ve encountered. Myfanwy wakes up with no memory  and has to piece things together through clues her past self left (in the form of notes in coat pockets) and excellent deductive reasoning.

Myfanwy has a unique set of skills that would make Liam Neeson’s character from Taken shit his pants.

Literally.

Myfanwy can control people through touch, and her past self, whom Myfanwy calls Thomas, never really explored that power. The titular Rook, Myfanwy/Thomas serves as a member of the Checquy, a secret British organization responsible for keeping a lid on paranormal activity, conducting research, and offering support to those with powers.

The combination of Myfanwy’s narrative and Thomas’s letters allow the reader a unique perspective into one person whose selves are night and day. Thomas is more timid, a bureaucrat comfortable in a more diplomatic, sometimes soft-spoken role. Understandable — traumatic experiences growing up have made her afraid to use her powers.

Still, Thomas is a force with which to be reckoned. While she might not be an “action girl,” she doesn’t shy away from getting her hands dirty, especially when she realizes that she’s on the trail of something dangerous and potentially deadly.

Myfanwy, by contrast, is more outspoken and bold. She takes chances. She delights in her own capabilities and potential, because she does not bear the emotional trauma of learning to control them. She retains that keen sense of reasoning and intuition, and she finishes the investigation Thomas started.

But for all her blunt bravado, she’d be nothing without her past self’s guidance. It creates a beautiful narrative balance, with both characters reliant on each other and their strengths and weaknesses dovetailing nicely. Two different characters embodying the same woman, seeking to achieve the same goal. It’s a funny, charming, and oddly inspiring work, so I hope you’ll take a moment to sit down and read a few pages.

There will be fist pumps, because Myfanwy isn’t the only awesome character. You’ll see.

A final note: I listened to The Rook as an audiobook and while I really enjoyed it, I would recommend reading the physical book. The narrator, Susan Duerden, does a fantastic job, but the book includes a lot of longer exposition/back story breaks in media res, and I personally find those a bit tedious during a listen.

Thanks for reading! What do you think of Agnieska? 

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4 thoughts on “Myfanwy Thomas, written by Daniel O’Malley

  1. Jenny @ Reading the End says:

    I cannot WAIT to read this. My sister lent my mum her copy of it, so it’s at my mother’s house (my mother having loved it) waiting for me to borrow it also. I’m just trying to decide if I should read it now, or wait until the sequel is out next year? Did you feel this one ended on a cliffhanger, or did it feel finished at the end?

    Like

    • Justice says:

      I thought O’Malley did a fine job of leaving the door open for future sequels, but I felt like The Rook stood on its own. It’s the kind of ending where you hope there are more books, rather than thinking “Dangit, now I have to wait over a year for this cliffhanger!”

      Like

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