Writer Wednesday | Writing Identity

Apparently my writing identity involves procrastination and a general sense of lackadaisy. I’ve been in a blogging/reading/writing slump. In June, I finished only three books and listened to only two audiobooks. Writing-wise, my progress has been glacial. I simply cannot find motivation. It is ironic I have posted about writer’s block and now find myself succumbing to the malady. I’m attempting to self-medicate with short stories, flash fiction, and a Kindle backlog. I’ll keep you all apprised of my progress.

Given my writer’s block and general unmotivated state, I’m not going to talk about specific writing tips today.

writers-block-clips-humor-best-demotivational-posters

Instead, I’d like to (briefly) muse on a writer’s identity. I’ve struggled to define myself as a writer, not sure how to effectively break down my style. My current work-in-progress manuscript is fantasy, but I don’t consider myself a fantasy author. Most of my short stories and other book ideas are non-genre fiction. I don’t consider that a huge problem; I don’t seek to be a “genre” writer, and plenty of published authors have dabbled in genre. However, I need to be able to define myself in a specific way – even if I can’t break that into categories.

Then I read the beautiful and captivating debut The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey. There’s a line with which I fell in love: “There is something fanciful and yet feral about them [drawings of Alaska].”

This was, of course, the descriptor for which I was searching: fanciful and yet feral. That is what I write: something with a touch of whimsy and darkness, that skates on the edge between magic and madness. My writing identity is not a category, and it’s not about genre; it’s about themes and style, purpose and prose.

How would you identify yourself as a writer? What descriptors would you use? 

Source:
Ivey, Eowyn (2012-02-01). The Snow Child: A Novel (p. 251). Reagan Arthur Books. Kindle Edition.

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